Orleans Parish Sheriff, Marlin Gusman, talks about hurricane preparedness and evacuation procedures of inmates during a press conference Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Katrina was the deadliest and most destructive Atlantic tropical cyclone of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the costliest natural disaster, as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States.

Among recorded Atlantic hurricanes, it was thesixth strongest overall. At least 1,833 people died in the storm and subsequent floods, making it the deadliest U.S. hurricane since the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane; total property damage was estimated at $81 billion (2005 USD),[1] nearly triple the damage brought by Hurricane Andrew in 1992.[3]

Katrina formed over the Bahamas on August 23, 2005 and crossed southern Florida as a moderate Category 1 hurricane, causing some deaths and flooding there before strengthening rapidly in the Gulf of Mexico. The storm strengthened to a Category 5 storm over the warm Gulf water, but weakened before making its second landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on the morning of Monday, August 29 in southeast Louisiana. It caused severe destruction along the Gulf coast from central Florida to Texas, much of it due to the storm surge. The most significant number of deaths occurred in New OrleansLouisiana, which flooded as the levee system catastrophically failed, in many cases hours after the storm had moved inland.[4] Eventually 80% of the city and large tracts of neighboring parishes became flooded, and the flood waters lingered for weeks.[4]However, the worst property damage occurred in coastal areas, such as all Mississippi beachfront towns, which were flooded over 90% in hours, as boats and casino barges rammed buildings, pushing cars and houses inland, with waters reaching 6–12 miles (10–19 km) from the beach.

 Wikipedia

Orleans Parish Sheriff, Marlin Gusman, talks about hurricane preparedness and evacuation procedures of inmates during a press conference Wednesday, June 19, 2013.

Here is a matter of tremendous importance to all of us who remember Katrina and the terrible devastation it brought to our homes and our community. Stay informed!

 

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About Martin E. Regan, Jr.

Year after year, Martin E. Regan Jr., the firm’s senior partner, has dedicated tireless efforts on behalf of the accused and produce wins for clients that a less determined advocate would have thought hopeless.  Martin E. Regan Jr.’s ability to tackle and win tough criminal cases has resulted in verdicts of acquittal in many highly publicized trials.