What to do if your are injured after a dog bite..

 

 

An dog bite or attack is a form of personal injury and can be quite dangerous and even fatal.

 

According to the American Humane Society, the U.S. has over 4.7 million dog bites a year; over 800,000 of these bites require medical attention.

 

According to the Center for Decease Control, in 2012, approximately 27,000 people required reconstructive surgery as the result of a dog bite.

Unfortunately, young children are the most vulnerable of dog bite victims. Most serious injuries occur in children who are less than 10 years old. Children often sustain injuries that are fatal. There are also serious physical trauma such as head, neck or facial injuries. According to the CDC, the odds of a child suffering a dog bite injury is 3.2 to 1.

These tragic injuries may result in severe scarring, disfigurement and emotional trauma caused by the dog bite. If you or a child has been hurt by a dog bite, then you are rightly shocked and angry.

If you are a victim of a dog bite, you are asking yourself, Who is going to pay for the medical bills associated with the dog bite injury?

 

If you have suffered a dog bite, seek medical attention for your injuries. You need to make sure the dog has had rabies shots; you may also need a police report.

 

Injury from a dog bitemay include:

  • Reddens or sign of infection
  • Injuries to the extremities.
  • Puncture
  • Laceration
  • contusion/abrasion/hematoma
  • cellulites/infection
  • amputation/avulsion/crush
  • fracture/dislocation.

 

A dog bite may result in serious infection and even death.  Do not take a dog bite lightly.

 

Dog bite statistics published by the Center for Deceases Control (CDC) include:

ü  An estimated 4.7 million dog bites occur in the U.S. each year.

ü  Nearly 800,000 dog bites require medical care.

ü  Approximately 92% of fatal dog attacks involved male dogs, 94% of which were not neutered.

ü  Approximately 25% of fatal dog attacks involved chained dogs.

ü  Approximately two-thirds of bites occurred on or near the victim’s property, and most victims knew the dog.

ü  The insurance industry pays more than $1 billion in dog-bite claims each year.

ü  Approximately 24% of human deaths involved unrestrained dogs off of their owners’ property.

ü  Approximately 58% of human deaths involved unrestrained dogs on their owners’ property.

ü  Every year more than 4.7 million people are bitten by dogs.

ü  Of those people who are bitten, 1 in 5 require medical attention.

ü  The most common injury are those to the face at approximately 77%.

ü  There are 44,000 dog bite injuries to the face each year in the U.S.

ü  In 2010 there were 34 dog-bite related deaths

ü  Pit bulls and Rottweiler’s are the two breeds most likely to cause an injury.

 

stock-photo-dog-teeth-121891849

Damages for injuries:

If you or your child have been injured by a dog that does not belong to you, you may be entitled to recover damages in the form of financial compensation from the person at fault, in this case, the dog owner. He or she is responsible for the dog and therefore must be held accountable for the injuries and damages inflicted by the animal. Damages may include:

 

In Louisiana, general damages include:

ü  Medical expenses

ü  Future medical costs (including those of cosmetic surgery and rehabilitation.)

ü  Past and future pain and suffering.

ü  Past and future mental anguish.

ü  Lost wages

ü  Lost earning capacity

ü  Pain and suffering

ü  Emotional damage

ü  Counseling/therapy expenses.

ü  past and future loss of enjoyment of life

ü  loss of consortium

ü  permanent disability of the body.

 

We Urge to Seek Legal Representation Immediately

If you are the victim of an animal bite or attack call us. If you have been hurt, your injury may have far reaching consequences that may impact your future well being. Please consider taking immediate action.    Seek legal counsel right away. A skillful attorney can help you navigate the criminal justice system and obtain the best possible outcome in your case.

We at The Law Firm of Regan Law, P.L.C. can offer you the guidance you need during these difficult times. Our Team of experienced attorneys under the leadership of Attorney Martin E. Regan, Jr. can help you now.  Call us.

The Legal Team at Regan Law, P.L.C. offers the client knowledge, skill and experience.

REMEMBER: The Information contained herein is not intended to be legal advice. On the contrary, it is simply an effort to explain the topic in general terms.  If you or a loved one is facing criminal charges, call us. We are here to help.

Call for a free INITIAL consultation with a member of our experienced personal injury Team.

 

Dog Bite or Attack Law in Louisiana
West’s Louisiana Statutes Annotated. Louisiana Revised Statutes. Title 14. Criminal Law. Chapter 1. Criminal Code. Part VI. Offenses Affecting The Public Generally. Subpart B. Offenses Affecting The Public Sensibility. § 102.14. Unlawful ownership of dangerous dog. Also: Title 3. Agriculture and Forestry. Chapter 18. Animals Running at Large. Part V. Dog License Tax.*

Citation: LA R.S. 14:102.14; L.A. R.S. § 2771 – 2778

Citation: LSA-R.S. 14:102.14; LSA-R.S. 3:2771 – 2778

Last Checked by Web Center Staff: 01/2014

Summary:   These Louisiana statutory sections provide the state’s animal control and dangerous dog laws.  A dog becomes dangerous when (1) unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, engages in any behavior that requires a defensive action by any person to prevent bodily injury when the person and the dog are off the property of the owner of the dog; (2) any dog which, when unprovoked, bites a person causing an injury; or (3) any dog which, when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, has killed, seriously bitten, inflicted injury, or otherwise caused injury to a domestic animal off the property of the owner of the dog.  It is unlawful for any person to own a dangerous dog without properly restraining or confining the dog.  Any citizen or officer may kill any dangerous or vicious dog, and no citizen or officer shall be liable for damages or to prosecution by reason of killing any dangerous or vicious dog.  The section also provides laws on licensing, vaccination, and prohibitions on dogs running at large. **

Statute in Full: 

Title 14. Criminal Law. Chapter 1. Criminal Code. Part VI. Offenses Affecting the Public Generally. Subpart B. Offenses Affecting the Public Sensibility

§ 102.14. Unlawful ownership of dangerous dog

Title 3. Agriculture and Forestry. Chapter 18. Animals Running at Large. Part V. Dog License Tax

§ 2771. Dogs not to run at large

§ 2772. Dog, cat, and kennel licenses fee and certificate; records

§ 2773. Dogs as personal property; seizure of dogs running at large or on property fenced as a fox pen; notice to owner; dangerous or vicious dogs

§ 2774. Parishes to provide animal facilities

§ 2775. Use of dogs for hunting

§ 2776. Time for paying dog license tax

§ 2777. Penalty for violating this Part or disturbing dog’s collar or license tax tag

§ 2778. Home rule charter governments

§ 102.14. Unlawful ownership of dangerous dog.

A. For the purposes of this Section “dangerous dog” means:

(1) Any dog which when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, engages in any behavior that requires a defensive action by any person to prevent bodily injury when the person and the dog are off the property of the owner of the dog; or

(2) Any dog which, when unprovoked, bites a person causing an injury; or

(3) Any dog which, when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, has killed, seriously bitten, inflicted injury, or otherwise caused injury to a domestic animal off the property of the owner of the dog.

B. It is unlawful for any person to own a dangerous dog without properly restraining or confining the dog.

C. A dangerous dog, while on the owner’s property, shall, at all times, be kept indoors, or in a secure enclosure. A dangerous dog may be off the owner’s property only if it is restrained by a leash which prevents its escape or access to other persons.

D. The owner of a dog determined by the court to be dangerous shall post signs around the secure enclosure no more than thirty feet apart and at each normal point of ingress and egress. The signs shall bear the words “Beware of Dog”, or “Dangerous Dog” in letters at least three and one-half inches high and shall be so placed as to be readily visible to any person approaching the secure enclosure.

E. If the dog in question dies, or is sold, transferred, or permanently removed from the municipality or parish where the owner resides, the owner of a dangerous dog shall notify the animal control agency of the changed condition and new location of the dog in writing within two days.

F. Whoever violates the provisions of this Section shall be fined not more than three hundred dollars.

G. The provisions of this Section shall not apply to:

(1) Any dog which is owned, or the service of which is employed, by any state or local law enforcement agency for the principal purpose of aiding in the detection of criminal activity, enforcement of laws, or apprehension of offenders.

(2) Any dog trained in accordance with the standards of a national or regional search and rescue association to respond to instructions from its handler in the search and rescue of lost or missing individuals and which dog, together with its handler, is prepared to render search and rescue services at the request of law enforcement.

Added by Acts 2001, No. 823, § 1.

§ 2771. Dogs not to run at large

No person shall suffer or permit any dog in his possession, or kept by him about his premises, to run at large on any unenclosed land, or trespass upon any enclosed or unenclosed lands of another.

Acts 1918, No. 239, § 1.

 § 2772. Dog, cat, and kennel licenses fee and certificate; records

A. Each parish or municipality that levies a license fee on dogs and cats shall issue a metallic license tag to each dog or cat owner who applies therefore and pays the dog or cat license fee imposed by the issuing parish or municipality. The license tag shall contain a license number, the name of the issuing body and the calendar year for which such tag is issued. The tag shall be fastened upon the collar worn by the dog or cat owned or kept by such person. A license certificate shall also be issued for such license fee showing the name and address of the owner, a description of the dog or cat by sex and color, the breed of the dog or cat if known, and the year and number of the license tag. A record of all such information shall be kept by the issuing authority which shall be open to the public during regular business hours.

B. The governing body of each municipality or parish may, by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for the dog or cat license fee, which sum shall not be more than ten dollars for each spayed or neutered dog or cat and not more than twenty dollars for each unspayed or unneutered dog or cat. However, notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary, the governing body of any municipality or parish with a population in excess of four hundred seventy-five thousand persons may, by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for the dog or cat license fee, which sum shall not be more than ten dollars for each spayed or neutered dog or cat and not more than twenty dollars for each unspayed or unneutered dog or cat, and any such funds derived from said license fee shall be dedicated solely for the capture, control, and housing of stray animals.

C. For the purposes of this Section, a dog or cat shall be considered spayed or neutered whenever any of the following is applicable:

(1) Upon presentation of a certificate issued by any licensed veterinarian stating that the dog or cat, if female, was made incapable of producing young by spaying by the veterinarian, or, the dog or cat, if male, was made incapable of producing young by sterilization by the veterinarian.

(2) Upon examination by a licensed veterinarian any dog or cat, whether male or female, is certified by the veterinarian to be incapable of producing young.

(3) If the dog or cat has been previously licensed as a spayed or neutered dog or cat.

D. Dogs used as guides for blind persons and commonly known as “seeing-eye” dogs or dogs used to assist deaf persons and commonly known as “hearing-ear” dogs may be licensed as other dogs herein provided for, except that the owner or keeper of such dog shall not be required to pay any fee therefore.

E. The owner or keeper of five or more dogs may procure a kennel license and pay a kennel license fee in lieu of the individual dog licenses and license fees provided for herein. The governing body of each municipality or parish, may by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for the kennel license fee, which sum shall be a minimum of:

(1) Fifteen dollars if no more than five dogs over the age of six months are harbored on the owner’s premises at the time of the application.

(2) Twenty-five dollars if more than five dogs but no more than ten dogs over the age of six months are harbored on the owner’s premises at the time of the application.

(3) Thirty dollars if more than ten dogs over the age of six months are harbored on the owner’s premises at the time of the application.

A licensed veterinarian or a veterinary clinic shall be exempt from this provision in the conduct of their regular business.

F. Upon the issuance of a kennel license, the owner shall be furnished a number of license tags equal to the number of dogs harbored on the owner’s premises. All of the provisions contained in Subsection (A) of this Section with regard to issuance of license tag, license certificates and the keeping of records shall also apply to kennel licenses.

G. Any individual or business with five or more dogs and who breeds and sells dogs retail, wholesale, or to the public is required to procure a kennel license and pay a kennel license fee in lieu of the individual dog licenses and license fees provided for herein. The governing body of each municipality or parish may, by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for the kennel license fee, which sum shall be dedicated solely for animal impoundment facilities and be a minimum of:

(1) Fifteen dollars, if no more than five dogs over the age of six months are harbored on the owner’s premises at the time of the application.

(2) Twenty-five dollars, if more than five dogs but no more than ten dogs over the age of six months are harbored on the owner’s premises at the time of the application.

(3) Thirty dollars, if more than ten dogs over the age of six months are harbored on the owner’s premises at the time of the application.

H. No individual or business that breeds, buys, or sells dogs retail, wholesale, or to the public shall maintain more than seventy-five dogs over the age of one year at any time for breeding purposes.

I. Any person who violates the provisions of this Section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be fined not more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.

Amended by Acts 1982, No. 101, § 1, eff. July 11, 1982; Acts 1991, No. 940, § 1; Acts 2008, No. 894, § 1; Acts 2010, No. 92, § 1.

§ 2773. Dogs as personal property; seizure of dogs running at large or on property fenced as a fox pen; notice to owner; dangerous or vicious dogs

A. Dogs owned by citizens of this state and by citizens of other states and situated and located in this state are declared to be personal property of such citizens.

B. Any citizen may, or the sheriff, constable, or other police officers of any parish, ward, or municipality shall seize any dog found unaccompanied by its owner or keeper and running at large on any road, street, or other public place, or trespassing on any premises other than the premises of the owner. If the dog is wearing a collar bearing a tag showing the name and address of its owner, it shall be impounded and the citizen or officer so seizing and impounding the dog shall immediately thereafter by written notice notify the owner of the dog, at the address disclosed by the tag on the dog’s collar, that the dog has been seized and impounded by him, and unless the owner or keeper of the dog shall, within seven days from the receipt of the notice, claim the dog and pay the citizen or officer a fee of one dollar for seizing and a fee of twenty-five cents for each day it is impounded, it shall be disposed of in a humane manner.

C. Except in the parishes of St. Helena, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, and Washington, any citizen may, or the sheriff, constable, or other police officers of any parish, ward, or municipality shall, seize any dog found unaccompanied by its owner or keeper and trespassing on any premises that is fenced with at least a two-inch by four-inch wire mesh that is a minimum of four feet high. If the dog is wearing a collar bearing a tag showing the name and address of its owner, it shall be impounded and the citizen or officer so seizing and impounding the dog shall immediately thereafter, by written notice, notify the owner of the dog, at the address disclosed by the tag on the collar of the dog, that the dog has been seized and impounded by him, and unless the owner or keeper of the dog shall, within seven days from receipt of the notice, claim the dog and pay a seizing fee of twenty dollars and an impoundment fee of one dollar for each day it is impounded, it shall be disposed of in a humane manner. Ten dollars of the seizing fee shall be paid to the law enforcement agency called upon to seize the dog. The remainder of the seizing fee shall be donated to a recognized nonprofit conservation group. This Subsection shall apply only to fox pens.

D. Any citizen or officer may kill any dangerous or vicious dog, and no citizen or officer shall be liable for damages or to prosecution by reason of killing any dangerous or vicious dog.

Amended by Acts 1950, No. 231, § 1; Acts 1992, No. 1131, § 1.

§ 2774. Parishes to provide animal facilities

Each parish shall provide suitable shelters or facilities for dogs seized under the provisions of this Part.

Amended by Acts 2003, No. 133, § 1, eff. May 28, 2003.

§ 2775. Use of dogs for hunting

Nothing in this Part shall prevent any citizen of this state from lawfully hunting with a dog, provided the dog is accompanied by the owner or keeper.

Acts 1918, No. 239, § 5.

§ 2776. Time for paying dog license tax

All license taxes on dogs are due annually on the anniversary date of the administration of the rabies vaccination; provided that as soon as a dog becomes no more than six months of age [FN1] the owner of the dog shall be liable to pay the license tax for the year in which the dog reaches such age.

[FN1] As appears in the enrolled bill (Acts 1992, No. 131).

Amended by Acts 1992, No. 131, § 1.

 

§ 2777. Penalty for violating this Part or disturbing dog’s collar or license tax tag

Whoever violates any provision of this Part, or fails or neglects to perform any duty imposed by it, shall be fined not less than twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars and the cost of prosecution, or imprisoned for not more than thirty days, or both.

Whoever removes from any dog a collar bearing a license tax tag as provided for in this Part, or alters or removes any such license tax tag from a dog properly registered as herein provided for, shall be fined not more than one hundred dollars and the cost of the prosecution, or imprisoned for not more than thirty days, or both.

Acts 1918, No. 239, § 7.

§ 2778. Home rule charter governments

Nothing contained in this Part shall be construed to prevent or otherwise limit the governing authority of a municipality or parish from setting fees and fines in amounts sufficient for the operation of its animal control program or for the effective enforcement of its animal control ordinances; however, in the absence of the adoption of such ordinances, the parish or local governing authority shall rely on the provisions of R.S. 3:2773.

* Re-printed from the Animal Legal & Historic Center

** Re-printed from the Animal Legal & Historic Center